North Wales. UK

North Wales Photographs – a Visitors Location Guide

Author: simonkit

Although most photographs of North Wales viewed around the Internet seem to focus on Snowdonia National Park and the coastal areas around Anglesey, North Wales has many fantastic opportunities for photography, many often missed by visitors. The aim of this guide is to provide an insight into photo locations around North Wales, some often unnoticed by photographers and tourist alike.

The town of Llangollen is not to be missed, not only is the town itself quite picturesque but it’s overlooked by Castell Dinas Bran and surrounded by stunning scenery – Worlds End, Eglwyseg rocks, Horseshoe Pass to name a few. The Llangollen Canal provides photographers with even more varied opportunities, wildlife is commonplace along the canal banks too.

For photographers interested in architecture don’t miss Plas Newydd andValle Crucis Abbey both closeby to Llangollen. Also Rug Chapel and Llangar Church in nearby Corwen and the impressive Pontcysyllte and Chirk Aqueducts along the Llangollen Canal. Chirk castle isn’t too far away either and the National Trust property of Errdig near Wrexham has great photo opportunities, providing architecture and historic gardens.

Railway enthusiasts / photographers are also catered for in Llangollen where the restored railway line runs frequent Steam Train trips.

For landscape photographers the scenery around Snowdonia often means that they miss many of the other great opportunities that North Wales provides. A drive a little further north towards Ruthin provides photo opportunities of the Clywdian hills. The highest peak, Moel Famau is well worth the walk to the summit. Also along the same range is Penycloddiau and Moel Arthur, both excellent photo vantage points. Whilst the Clywdian Hills may not provide quite as much drama as the Snowdonia National Park photographers should definitely consider them when visiting North Wales.

Not far from Llangollen are the relatively unknown Berwyn Mountains, again well worth a visit although access is more limited than that to the Clywdian Hills and Snowdonia National Park. At the base of the Berwyn range, near Llanrhaeadr ym Mochnant is perhaps the most impressive waterfall in North Wales, which again most photographers miss completely. The Pistyll Rhaeder Waterfall is one of the ‘Seven wonders of Wales’ – it’s actually the highest waterfall in Wales/England and provides excellent photo opportunities. Not only is the waterfall impressive but it’s location is a little special too. For photographers looking for waterfalls, two other excellent locations exist: Aber Falls close to Bangor and Swallow Falls at Betws-y-coed, a village well worth a visit. Also Talacre beach on the North Wales coast has a fantastic lighthouse and providing the photographer with great opportunities. As usual sunrise and sunset provides the best lighting.

For photographers interested in castles the list is almost endless, I would be surprised if any other location around the world provides as many photo opportunities in such a small area. The most spectacular castles are undoubtedly Conway and Caernarfon, both extremely impressive and dusk / nighttime photographs of both are very popular as they are well lit out of daylight hours. Penrhyn castle close to Bangor is somewhat unique, a modern ‘fairytale’ structure. Beaumaris castle on Anglesey is excellent, the views from the castle across to the Snowdonia mountains are also impressive whilst Chirk castle near Llangollen is also extremely well preserved and photo worthy. As already mentioned the ruins of Castell Dinas Bran provide impressive views over Llangollen and the Vale of Clywd and are worth the climb.

Whilst the aforementioned castles are perhaps structurally or visually the most impressive in North Wales there are others that photographers should seriously consider. Rhuddlan castle near Rhyl is still well intact, Dolwyddelan castle has undergone renovation and is beautifully located, as is Dolbadarn castle on the side of Llyn Padarn in Llanberis. Several other castles exist around North Wales and whilst less photogenic than others are well worth considering if in the area: Flint Castle along the coastline, Denbigh castle, Hawarden Castle, close to Chester and finally Caergwrle castle close to Wrexham.

The above locations are by no means a definitive list of all photography related locations around North Wales, there are simply endless photo opportunities. Hopefully however this guide will provide unfamiliar photographers and visitors with a few more options when visiting North Wales.

Original at Landscapephotographyuk.com

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/destinations-articles/north-wales-photographs-a-visitors-location-guide-302091.html

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North wales Landscape Photographs – Snowdonia and Anglesey

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Landscape Photography Guide to Anglesey, North Wales – Rhosneigr to Aberffraw

Author: simonkit

Rhosneigr is a very popular tourist destination, particular with anyone interested in watersports, this makes it a great place for photographers who like capturing windsurfer shots and the like. The village itself doesn’t really have anything to attract the landscape photographer, but the surrounding coastline and beaches provide more than adequate compensation. The main beach at Rhosneigr has far and sweeping views of the surrounding Anglesey coastline, the wide-angle lens can be put to good use again here.

Leaving Rhosneigr along the Anglesey Coastal Path towards Aberffraw immediately brings you to a section of golden sand, half way along which are some excellent rock formations – foreground interest is no problem here. On leaving the beach the coastal path continues along the cliffs, initially passing an ancient burial chamber (another photography opportunity) and then two small sandy coves, the larger of which provides the photographer with good possibilities. The coastal path then passes through several fields lacking any noteworthy views or features but soon arrives at Anglesey Racing Circuit. This location is easily reached by car and is an ideal opportunity for any photographer interested in motor sport. Anglesey Circuit holds occasional events but is more frequently open to the public, a variety of motorbikes and high-powered cars can be photographed.

Continuing along the Anglesey Coastal Path photographers are provided with a somewhat unique opportunity. On arriving at a small sweeping bay, just on the outskirts of Aberffraw, an ancient church can be seen surrounded by the sea on its own small island. This is the church of St Cwyfan, dating back to the 12th century. It is accessible by foot, but only at low tide via a small rocky causeway. This is another ‘not to be missed’ photographic opportunity. Personally, I believe the best landscape photograph of the church is taken when the tide has just started to recede, leaving the route of the causeway uncovered but the church still surrounded by the sea. This small bay can actually be reached by a very narrow track from Aberffraw but be warned, in busy periods progress along it can be slow, walking the short distance from Aberffraw is probably preferable.

Having exhausted all photographic possibilities at the church the Anglesey Coastal Path continues on to Aberffraw, the approach to which is particularly photogenic. The village itself sits at the outlet of a river and this provides a good subject. A little experimentation is required to find the best angle for a pleasing photograph, the best possibility is use a wide-angle lens to try and include the attractive section of beach located on the opposite side of the river.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/photography-articles/landscape-photography-guide-to-anglesey-north-wales-rhosneigr-to-aberffraw-106075.html

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My website : landscapephotographyuk.com —-

UK landscape photography from Anglesey and Snowdonia in North Wales and other UK regions

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Landscape Photography Guide to Anglesey, North Wales – Aberffraw to Llanddwyn

Author: simonkit

The coastal path between Aberffraw and Llanddwyn is the most unspoilt and visually attractive area on the Isle of Anglesey, it’s also my own personal favourite landscape photography location on the island. After leaving the beach at Aberffraw behind the Anglesey Coastal Path passes through several with little to interest the landscape photographer. On reaching Maltreath however, the situation improves dramatically. From here to Llanddwyn the beaches are just stunning, miles of beautiful, unspoilt sand – a landscape photographers paradise you might say. Photograph opportunities are numerous although the better ones are closest to Llanddwyn Island.

Although know as an island, Llanddwyn is actually only isolated during high tide for a short time. The island has much to interest the landscape photographer – two excellent lighthouses, both having the stunning backdrop of the Snowdonia Mountains. Of the two lighthouses I personally prefer the newest one, it’s located on the very end of the island and the beach below provides an ideal position from which to get that perfect shot. Also in summer the sun sets directly behind the lighthouse enhancing the already impressive backdrop. Other features of Llanddwyn Island include the ancient ruined abbey and the more modern, but ancient looking crosses, one Celtic and the other Latin. Both of these stand in prominent positions and provide even more creative options for the landscape photographer. The all-round view from the island is simply stunning too, particularly when looking towards the mainland of Wales and the numerous mountains of the Snowdonia range. As an added bonus, the island (and Llanddwyn beach itself) is a perfect place to take both sunrise and sunset photographs and for those interested in wildlife photography, the island is inhabited by its very own wild horses which, if you are lucky, will pose nicely against the scenic backdrop.

Leaving Llanddwyn Island and following the Anglesey Coastal Path along Llanddwyn beach doesn’t mean the photographer needs to put their camera away. The beach is full of character, perhaps more so at low tide. Large sand dunes line the beach and the nearby forest continues alongside. When the tide recedes the beach is a mass of sand, much of it full of texture and detail, certain to capture the landscape photographers eye. Foreground interest for those wide-angle landscape shots is easily found as is the opportunity to indulge in a few macro shots. The already stunning beach is further enhanced by the ever-present mountain backdrop provided by the Snowdonia National Park. Towards the end of the vast beach, as it nears the Menai Straits, the mountains become much closer in perspective, a good wide angle lens capturing some great detail and contours. Across the Menai Straits Caernarfon and it’s imposing castle can also be seen, although at a distance requiring the use of a powerful telephoto lens to ensure the capture of an effective photograph.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/photography-articles/landscape-photography-guide-to-anglesey-north-wales-aberffraw-to-llanddwyn-106080.html

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My website : landscapephotographyuk.com —-

UK landscape photography from Anglesey and Snowdonia in North Wales and other UK regions

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Landscape Photography Guide to Snowdonia, North Wales – the Valleys of Nant Ffrancon & Ogwen

Author: simonkit

These two valleys alone could provide the photographer with a lifetime of possibilities. Access is via the A5, travelling either from Bethesda in the west or Capel Curig in the east. Bethesda, although lacking the attractive appearance of the more picturesque Snowdonia villages is certainly not without character. It was built around the slate quarrying industry and is surrounded by the evidence of this, photographers particularly interested in industrial landscapes will find it a fascinating area, don’t dismiss it on first impressions. In contrast, Capel Curig is much smaller and generally speaking, more visually appealing. It is more a hamlet than a village and is surrounded on all sides by impressive scenery. The Afon Llugwy runs through the centre, providing the spectacle of the Pont Cyfyng falls, particularly photogenic after a period of rainfall. Also, just on the outskirts are the desolate looking lakes known as Llynnau Mymbyr, surrounded by Moel Siabod, the Glyderau mountains and in the distance, the highest mountain in Wales, Snowdon.

Starting the journey along the A5 from the west, after leaving Bethesda the Nant Ffrancon valley appears dramatically in view, the road surrounded by two impressive mountain ranges, the Glyderau on one side and the Carneddau on the other. The picturesque river Ogwen flows through the valley too, nearby the road for much of the route towards Ogwen and it provides a great ‘lead-in’ for a shot along the valley, mountains and all. For those energetic photographers, equipped with a well-detailed “Ordnance Survey” map, there are several walking routes that start from Bethesda and climb the surrounding mountains, indeed it’s possible to walk the full distance from Bethesda to Capel Curig along the mountains – a distance of 16 kilometres and height gain of 1600metres, a full day walk. The drive along the A5 to Ogwen presents multiple photographic opportunities, indeed the most difficult decision is what not to photograph. A stop at Ogwen is not to be missed as here you will find mountain lakes, waterfalls, impressive rock formations, flowing rivers and all of these no more than 30 minutes walk from the car park. For the more energetic the walking routes from Ogwen are nothing short of spectacular and provide a further wealth of photographic opportunities.

If the walking route directly behind Ogwen Cottage is chosen, ascending the Glyderau, a fascinating range of mountain scenery can be captured. The rugged and austere mountain known as Tryfan, world famous amongst climbers, the picturesque lake of Llyn Idwal and the mountain pass of Devils Kitchen. On reaching the summit the views down the Nant Ffrancon valley towards the Isle of Anglesey and across the Llanberis Pass to Snowdon are just breathtaking. Notable features on the summit include Bristly Ridge, Yr Wyddfa and Castell y Gwynt on Glyder Fach and the infamous Cantilever, a precariously balanced slate slab. These are only a few of the numerous attractions of this distinctive mountain range, all of which provide more than adequate compensation for the photographers efforts in reaching the summit.

If the path across from Ogwen Cottage is chosen then an ascent of the Carneddau is the objective. Even before starting the climb you arte confronted by the imposing figure of Pen yr olwen, a rugged and distinctive mountain standing directly alongside the A5. The Carneddau are quite different in character to the Glyderau mountains, equally as high, but on reaching the summit much flatter and less rugged in appearance. The view across to Tryfan from here is excellent, probably the place to capture Tryfan at its best. Walking along the ridge between Carnedd Dafydd and Carnedd Llewelyn, the Isle of Anglesey and the Menai straits are constantly in view, although some distance away so a good telephoto is essential. The reservoir of Ffynnon Llugwy also appears well below in a hidden valley, forming the source of the Afon Llugwy river that follows the A5 down to Betws-y-Coed.

Restarting the journey by road from Ogwen travelling along the A5 towards Capel Curig, the Ogwen valley opens out wider, mountains still surrounding the valley but less imposing. Open moorland becomes evident and the Afon Llugwy river continues its route through the valley. There are several parking places along the route and a photograph taken looking back towards Ogwen provides a view of Llyn Ogwen and its spectacular backdrop, the Glyderau mountains. Tryfan is outstanding from here too, the best photograph probably captured during a winter sunset. Nearing Capel Curig the valley sides flatten somewhat and the drama of earlier subsides as the rugged mountains are left behind. Capel Curig itself though has several possibilities, as already mentioned.

Finally, if time was limited and I had to choose the best photographic opportunities along this part of the A5, without doubt it would be Ogwen. The variety of scenery and drama it provides the photographer, within such a small area, make it just too appealing to miss.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/photography-articles/landscape-photography-guide-to-snowdonia-north-wales-the-valleys-of-nant-ffrancon-ogwen-106069.html

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My website : landscapephotographyuk.com —-

UK landscape photography from Anglesey and Snowdonia in North Wales and other UK regions

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Landscape Photography Guide to Anglesey, North Wales – Beaumaris to Benllech

Author: simonkit

Beaumaris is one of the most attractive towns on Anglesey, its location and castle ensuring its appeal to the landscape photographer. It’s situated directly across the Menai straits from Snowdonia National Park, whose impressive mountains provide a stunning backdrop. It’s also an excellent location for sunrise photographs as the sun rises directly behind the Snowdonia Mountains and creates stunning reflections in the Menai Straits. Beaumaris pier itself provides a good vantage point from which to capture these stunning scenes. In the Menai Straits themselves yachts and boats are frequently moored and can provide a good subject or alternatively some added foreground interest. Alongside the pier is a natural harbour, the main area for the numerous yachts and boats that visit Beaumaris, it’s another interesting possibility for the landscape photographer. Within the town itself is an impressive and particularly photogenic 13th century castle. A visit inside the castle can provide good views across the Menai Straits and towards the Snowdonia mountains, also a short distance along the coastal path behind the town is a small hill which provides the ideal vantage point for a wide angle photograph of the town, the castle and the surrounding landscape.

From Beaumaris to Penmon point the coastal path is flat all the way, running directly alongside the Menai Straits – be aware that at high tide much of the path is actually underwater. This section of the path provides a constant view of the Menai Straits, the Snowdonia Mountains and at a distance, the imposing Great Orme. Here though the beaches are not particularly photogenic, being mainly flat and indistinct. Personally, if I was to choose one particular photography location along this section of the coastal path I would go directly to Penmon point, easily accessible by car from Beaumaris. Here options for the landscape photographer include Penmon priory, Penmon point lighthouse and excellent views towards Puffin Island, the distant Great Orme and the ever-present Snowdonia mountains. Interesting rock formations can also be found a short distance along the shoreline from the lighthouse, offering the possibility for some imaginative macro shots.

Heading from Penmon point towards Red Wharf Bay the coastal path starts to climb above the coastline, providing the photographer with a new viewpoint of the lighthouse, Puffin Island and the Great Orme. Along this section of the path though the best location for a good landscape photograph has to be Red Wharf Bay, again accessible by car. It is a large open bay, appearing much like an estuary, which during low tide is a mass of golden sand – the of which character changes dramatically with the incoming tide. Personally, I think the best time for photography here is at low tide. The small village itself is directly alongside the bay and has some character. In particular the small harbour, with its usual collection of yachts, provides the landscape photographer with excellent opportunities. Continuing along the coastal path towards Benllech now involves a walk along the beach, tide permitting. The beach between Red Wharf Bay and Benllech has golden sand and again provides opportunities, although it lacks any particularly strong features. Benllech itself is a large town, mainly located slightly away from the coastline, which although pleasant, doesn’t have any special interest for the photographer.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/photography-articles/landscape-photography-guide-to-anglesey-north-wales-beaumaris-to-benllech-101981.html

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http://www.landscapephotographyuk.com

UK landscape photography from Anglesey and Snowdonia in North Wales and other UK regions.

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Landscape Photography Guide to Anglesey, North Wales – Holyhead to Trearddur

Author: simonkit

Holyhead itself is an interesting place, although certainly not the most photogenic location on the Isle of Anglesey. It does however have a hidden gem in the form of St Cybis church. Dating back several centuries this ancient church is worth a visit by the photographer, it is really the only interest in Holyhead though, unless shipping is one of your passions.

As the Anglesey Coastal Path leaves Holyhead the first photography worthy location is Breakwater Country Park. It contains some interesting rocky coastline but perhaps more interesting for the photographer is the actual breakwater itself, a massive manmade wall designed to protect the main port from the ravages of the sea. For the imaginative landscape photographer the structure could well provide some interesting possibilities. Leaving the Breakwater Country Park the coastal path rises with the cliffs and the landscape begins to improve, a backward glance gives a good panorama of the main Holyhead port and surrounding coastline. Holyhead Mountain soon appears, it’s certainly worth a shot or two if you can find an interesting angle. From the top of the mountain the view looking back across Anglesey is substantial, although as the island is quite flat, the landscape photographer will probably find the scene too lacking in distinctive features to consider a photograph. A glance out to sea however is more impressive, with the radar station at North Stack drawing attention. It’s possible to reach the radar station via a rocky lane and it’s certainly worth a visit as with some imagination it has good photographic potential.

Climbing back up the Anglesey Coastal Path from North Stack a distinct section of rocky scenery is encountered, the path is now quite high above the sea and has potential for another seascape or two. The main benefit of taking this route however, is that it soon reaches one of the most dramatically located lighthouses you’re likely to see, South Stack. The lighthouse is several hundred feet below the main cliffs on it’s own small island and can be approached via a set of steep steps and a robust metal bridge. Stood on the island near the lighthouse also provides the photographer with an excellent viewpoint from which to capture the dramatic cliffs and the abundant wildlife that inhabitants them. South Stack also provides the perfect location for sunset photographs, at least in summer, when the sun sets directly behind it. Climbing the steps up from the lighthouse the coastal path now heads downhill and passes the distinctive RSPB viewing tower situated on the cliff tops, definitely worth photographing. The Anglesey Coastal Path now continues along the high clifftops towards Trearddur, the view remains impressive. A frequent look backwards will provide numerous views of the lighthouse at South Stack and the opportunity to take numerous landscape shots with that wide-angle lens. Eventually South Stack lighthouse disappears from sight and as the rugged coastline continues a series of photogenic rock formations appear, each somewhat differing and offering the photographer some interesting possibilities. The photography options improve further on the approach to Trearddur as the coastal path passes a wonderful series of small rocky coves covered with golden sand, each of them with unique character. The best time for photography in these coves is probably when the tide is low as they all contain rich sand full of texture, providing intriguing foreground detail to that landscape photograph. The town of Trearddur itself is a modern, tourist-orientated place and doesn’t really provide much interest for the landscape photographer, although the nearby beach is situated in a wide sweeping bay that is quite photogenic.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/photography-articles/landscape-photography-guide-to-anglesey-north-wales-holyhead-to-trearddur-106072.html

About the Author

My website : landscapephotographyuk.com —–

UK landscape photography from Anglesey and Snowdonia in North Wales and other UK regions

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